Restorative Practices in our classrooms

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 by Laura Snider

Over the past month, members of the Student RJ Team and Longmont Community Justice Partnership's RPS staff have gone into three classrooms to speak with groups of students about restorative justice in schools. Two of those classes used Connection Circles to address issues of disrespect and violation of classroom norms. After an initial community-building circle, students identified ways they see the 5 R's (Relationship, Respect, Responsibility, Repair and Reintegration) in their classroom and real life. One of the Student RJ Team members led a discussion about how it feels when people are respecting one another and the teacher. The class then had an opportunity to discuss ways the 5 R's were not being upheld and the impact it had on the feeling of the class. Many students had insightful reflections and were able to express how it affects them personally and at school. At the end, each student made a commitment for what they could do moving forward to shift the classroom dynamics. Both classes have requested a follow-up presentation to "check in" after a few weeks.

The other class is reading Touching Spirit Bear by Ben Mikaelsen, a story about Cole, a young boy who is referred to circle justice after a violent assault. His initial attempt to manipulate the circle had severe consequences and the story is about his process of learning to control his anger, take responsibility and make things right with the victim. The class did a number of exercises including identifying how each of the 5 R's was missing in Cole's life before his circle and when he finally saw them appear. We built Cole's circle, with members of the class playing each of the participants, and found that each person in the circle needed to do their part for the circle to remain strong. As a class, they were able to find a balance with each other, using climbing webbing to support them as they sat down and stood up as a group. We simulated how the circle is affected when Cole did not take full responsibility and had a discussion about restorative justice programs and how circles are used in schools in St. Vrain Valley School District, Longmont, Colorado, the US and the world. All of the students waked away with a better understanding of how each of their choices affects not only themselves but also everyone around them.

Touching Spirit Bear Cover

LCJP's Restorative Practices in Schools Bilingual Intern, Adilene Taboada, currently attends UNC, Greeley.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 by Viktoria Lawson

I have been asked by many people; how did I get involved in restorative justice. I can't help but look up at them and smile because you see the way I got involved with restorative justice is through a teenager who is very caring and affectionate.This teenager is one of my family members, and he went through the restorative justice process which he completed successfully. What made me get involved more was to see how young kids such as him get that second chance to make things better. This process becomes an alternative by repairing the harms instead of having potential charges on their record at such a young age.  I was able to see him take responsibility for his mistakes and really try to make things right to the victim, community, family, school and anyone else that was harmed by his actions. It was a huge relief for me to see that it is okay to make mistakes (because everyone makes them), and it’s the actions you take after that helps you learn from these mistakes. It was interesting to see how my family's interactions with him changed because before the process, they had lost trust and the relationship they had before the incident. As a family we now try to spend more time together and really try to enjoy each other’s presence.  After seeing him go through this, my mother later on became a volunteer, sitting in processes as a community member and described how awesome this process was. I, of course, was curious to find out what it was all about, so I went through the training and became a community member. I have been hooked ever since.

When I went through training what really stuck with me was how a community member can have a really great impact on the referred student.  The community member brings in the outside perspective and how they’ve been impacted.  The thing that I would have to say inspired me was that I wanted to be a facilitator from the beginning of the community member training. The more that I sat in as a community member the more I wanted to learn how to be a facilitator. I think the one thing that surprised me was how the process worked because I had never seen anything like it.  I did not really know what I had to offer as a community member until I realized that my family is a huge strength of mine.  I always seem to incorporate them somehow when I sit in as a community member, usually by talking about how being a good role model as a big sister affects a family.

A little bit more about me is that I am a 21 year old Latina that enjoys new experiences. I was curious to see how this organization functioned on the other side of volunteer work, and to really see what it would be like to be an employee. Finding out about the internship was exciting because I was not too sure what I would be doing after I graduated high school, or even what the field of criminal justice provided. The fact that I had never thought about doing an internship made it all that much better, so I took on the challenge of experiencing what the work may be like.  I now am an intern here at LCJP working with the Student Restorative Justice Team.  I currently attend the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley and am a Sister of Pi Lambda Chi Latina Sorority Inc. I have two younger brothers that I deeply care for as a big sister and am very family-oriented. I am eager to learn more about RJ and ready to improve my skills here at LCJP.

By Adilene Taboada

Surrogate Victim Training Tonight

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

Participants who complete this training will be qualified to sit in restorative justice processes as a representative of the victim.

Whenever a victim is not able to participate, a surrogate victim volunteer will represent the victim. Having surrogate victims participate helps ensure the facilitator's neutrality during the restorative justice process and provides community input into the process.

We often have cases of shoplifting referred to LCJP by local merchants and department stores.  These business owners and managers are often great supporters of the program, but aren't able to take time off work to be present at the restorative justice process.

Having surrogate victims participate helps ensure the facilitator's neutrality during the restorative justice process and provides community input into the process.

 This would be an ideal situation for a volunteer who has worked in the community as a business owner to participate in a process as a victim advocate.  This person would be able to bring a deeper insight to the circle as to how businesses are affected when theft occurs.  

Participants who complete this training will be qualified to sit in restorative justice processes as a representative of the victim.

Whenever a victim is not able to participate, a surrogate victim volunteer will represent the victim. Having surrogate victims participate helps ensure the facilitator's neutrality during the restorative justice process and provides community input into the process.

We often have cases of shoplifting referred to LCJP by local merchants and department stores.  These business owners and managers are often great supporters of the program, but aren't able to take time off work to be present at the restorative justice process.

Having surrogate victims participate helps ensure the facilitator's neutrality during the restorative justice process and provides community input into the process.

 This would be an ideal situation for a volunteer who has worked in the community as a business owner to participate in a process as a victim advocate.  This person would be able to bring a deeper insight to the circle as to how businesses are affected when theft occurs.  

Whenever a victim is not able to participate, a surrogate victim volunteer will represent the victim. Having surrogate victims participate helps ensure the facilitator's neutrality during the restorative justice process and provides community input into the process.

We often have cases of shoplifting referred to LCJP by local merchants and department stores.  These business owners and managers are often great supporters of the program, but aren't able to take time off work to be present at the restorative justice process.

Having surrogate victims participate helps ensure the facilitator's neutrality during the restorative justice process and provides community input into the process.

 This would be an ideal situation for a volunteer who has worked in the community as a business owner to participate in a process as a victim advocate.  This person would be able to bring a deeper insight to the circle as to how businesses are affected when theft occurs.  

 

4 Hours to Change a Life – Come to Restorative Justice Volunteer Training – Saturday 4.13.13 - 9a-1p

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

What are you doing this weekend? No plans?  Would you trade four hours of your Saturday morning (We will provide the coffee for the opportunity to change another person’s life and make your city a safer place to live?

 

Four hours is the amount of time it takes to complete the introductory class to become a volunteer with LCJP.   During this time you will learn about the roots of the Restorative Justice process  which are connected to the native cultures of Maori of New Zealand  and the Navajo of the U.S. .

 

You will learn the basics of how to speak on behalf of the Longmont Community in a Restorative Justice process, If this training is like most others, you will have the opportunity to meet some very interesting neighbors with diverse backgrounds.

You don’t have to have any prior experience with law, education, or psychology but our discussions will cross into some of those areas during the training.  

If you are a student, this is a great resume builder.  The communication skills taught in these classes are then refined by sitting in real criminal cases referred by police officers.   You will have the opportunity to practice conflict resolution skills which are very marketable to employers regardless of what professional field you choose to enter into.

If this sounds interesting to you, please give me a call or send me an e-mail. I will be there, and the class is always more fun when it is filled with interesting people.   Better yet, CLICK HERE  and fill out the volunteer application to register for the training.

 

LCJP Volunteer Training

Saturday, April 13

9a-1p

333 Terry St.

Longmont, CO 80501

CLICK HERE to Register for Training 

Restorative Justice Decision Making Workshops - Transforming Mistakes into Learning Experiences

Friday, March 7, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

 

About:  This hybrid workshop is an innovative restorative based option for young people (ages 17-30) to improve clarity around personal decisions in small and large scales. The workshop involves a one hour online session, followed by a two hour face-to-face group, including activities and discussions to help participants identify alternatives, potential impacts, and successful outcomes for a variety of real life events. 

Cost:  The cost to participate in this program is $40. You will be asked to pay the workshop fee online before attending the workshop. 

CLICK HERE for a full list of Decision Making Workshop dates and to register and pay.

 

Restorative Circle (Advanced) Facilitator Training - Tips and Tricks for managing difficult cases

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

This training is available to anyone who has completed Restorative Circle Facilitator training and has sat in one or more processes as a co-facilitator. 

The goal of this training is to provide specific tools for facilitators to deal with difficult situations that come up on a regular basis during restorative justice processes. The curriculum for the training is flexible and the scenarios and discussions are based on requests from current LCJP facilitators based on the challenges they regularly face while managing processes. The subject matter may include but is not limited to:

  • How to work with minimizing parents/support people
  • How to work with offenders who avoid taking responsibility for their actions
  • How to expedite the agreement phase of the process
  • How to use motivational interviewing techniques to gain a deeper understanding of what happened during the story telling phase
  • How and when to refer a case back. 

For all LCJP training dates, information and to register CLICK HERE.

Restorative Justice Facilitator Peer-to-Peer Debrief and Dinner - Building Community

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

Last night 18 LCJP facilitators came together to enjoy a homemade chili dinner prepared by our executive director, Candy Campbell. We have started holding these quarterly dinner/debriefs to get know one another a little better and to share some of the wisdom our volunteers have gathered from their experiences sitting in RJ circles. 

Kathleen McGoey, the Community Restorative Justice Bilingual Case Coordinator, lead the discussion.  We  opened by introducing three of our newest apprentice facilitators, Julie Jarvis, Chris Newton, and Clay Hamilton. The focus then moved to our guest speakers, Claire and Peter, members of the high school student restorative justice team, who shared their perspective on how adults can make themselves relevent to youth offenders. Peter suggested that one way is by sharing a story of a time in their lives when they got into trouble and what they learned from the experience. Claire suggested that adult community members work to avoid identifying offenders by the one action that resulted in their participation in a restorative justice process. One way to do this is to focus on the positive learning that the offender could receive from participating in the process, and to identify and name a strength that the offender demonstrates. 

We are lucky to have student volunteers like Claire and Peter participate in the Community Restorative Justice program as well as the student team. Both Claire and Peter have assisted with training community members and school staff members in restorative justice skills. Both are poised, clear, and confident when speaking in front of groups of adults, and both credit this ability to their ongoing training and participation in restorative justice processes.  

The evening closed with a discussion on how best to incorporate community service into restorative justice agreement as a contract item.  Many organizations who offer community service opportunities require minors to be escorted by their parents.  This is an unrealistic request to make on many of our offenders. The group pooled its resources and experiences and came up with a number of great suggestions for dealing with this challenge. One great resource we found is the Youth Connection Guide put out by Volunteer Connection of Boulder County. This guide provides detailed list of opportunites for youth ages 7-16.

A big thanks to all of the facilitators and student team members who joined us for the dinner.  We look forward to the next Peer to Peer Debrief and Dinner on May 8th.

We are always looking for new  volunteer facilitators to join our team. Please join us for our next Restorative Circle Facilitator Training on March 15th & 16th.

CLICK HERE for a full list of Restorative Justice training opportunities provided by LCJP.

The Difference between Guilt and Shame

Friday, February 28, 2014 by Viktoria Lawson

By Brittney Mahaffey, LCJP Intern (Student at UNC, Major in Sociologist with a Minor in Criminal Justice)

Recognizing the difference between guilt and shame when involved in restorative processes is important because those feelings can help determine the likelihood an offender reoffending, which is very important for Restorative Justice Programs to be successful. By definition, guilt is “a feeling of responsibility or remorse for some offense” whereas shame is “the painful feeling arising from the consciousness of something dishonorable” (Dictionary.com). When people experience guilt for something they have done, they have feelings of remorse which pushes them into reparative actions such as apologies and the desire to make things right again. On the other hand, shame builds walls within a person in order to block the painful feeling one directs inward, resulting in blaming others and denying responsibility.

Remembering that punishment is not a goal in restorative justice will help eliminate the need for shame which in turn allows offenders to feel remorse for their actions and be moved to want to repair the harm done. When offenders are able to express their guilt in a safe environment and take reparative actions, they are less likely to offend again because tension has been eased in a healthy way, unlike shame which builds more and more tension which cannot be released positively, creating anger and the possibility of continued offenses. During restorative processes it is crucial to separate the offenders’ actions from their identities because everyone makes mistakes and we are providing an opportunity for offenders to fix their mistakes, not become them. 

Restorative Justice Education Series #4- Community Resources for Restorative Justice Agreements

Thursday, February 27, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

Restorative Justice Education Series #4- Community Resources for Restorative Justice Agreements

The Longmont Community Justice Partnership is pleased to offer the Restorative Justice Education Series. This series of free trainings has been developed to meet the ongoing training needs of Longmont Community Justice Partnership Volunteers, our Restorative Justice colleagues, and the community. 

The final installment of the Restorative Justice Education Series offered will provide an overview of community resources and how their services may be utilized in creating effective restorative justice agreements.

We Will:

  • Provide an overview of the community resources (such as local nonprofits and government agencies) available to assist volunteers in writing quality contract items
  • Review the elements that make up quality agreement items
  • Provide the opportunity to practice creating effective restorative justice contracts by incorporating the offerings of community resources using scenarios from actual restorative justice processes

CLICK HERE to register for this class or to see a full list of restorative justice training opportunities offered by LCJP.

ClICK HERE to learn more about volunteering with LCJP's Community Restorative Justices program.

Program Specific Facilitator Training

Monday, February 24, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

Program Specific Facilitator Training

All Longmont Community Justice Partnership facilitators are required to attend the program specific facilitator training prior to facilitating their first process. Facilitators will receive training on administrative tasks associated with facilitating a community group conference. These tasks include but are not limited to the following. 

  • How to access the LCJP House
  • How to read a police report
  • How to interpret a CRJ case file
  • Where to pick up the case file
  • How to submit paperwork following the completion of a process. 

NOTE: It is a prerequesite to attend Restorative Circle Facilitator Training prior to attending the program specific facilitator training.

CLICK HERE to register for this class or to see a full list of restorative justice training opportunities offered by LCJP.

ClICK HERE to learn more about volunteering with LCJP's Community Restorative Justices program.

 

Restorative Circle Facilitator Training

Friday, February 21, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

Restorative Circle Facilitator Training

This is a two-day, introductory restorative justice facilitator training. It explains what is restorative justice, introduces principles and skills needed to conduct a community group conference. A reading assignment will be given prior to the second day.

The restorative circle is a powerful restorative justice process which brings together offenders, victims, families, and community members in order to develop workable agreements that can lead to repair of harm, victim voice, offender learning and community building.

Participants are encouraged to volunteer with a restorative justice program subsequent to this training for an on-going support  and additional experience conducting conferences.

Experiential Training Emphasizes:

  • Role Plays
  • Small Group Interactions
  • Question and Answer Sessions
  • Coaching

Training Content Includes:

  • Restorative Justice Principles
  • Pre-conferencing Techniques
  • Victim Awareness
  • Facilitating a Conference
  • Writing Agreements.

CLICK HERE to register for this class or to see a full list of restorative justice training opportunities offered by LCJP.

ClICK HERE to learn more about volunteering with LCJP's Community Restorative Justices program.

 

Restorative Tools for the Classroom - RJ Training Opportunity

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

Restorative Tools for the Classroom - Training

Purpose: To give school personnel tools that can be used along the entire prevention-intervention spectrum for school-based offenses. Emphasis will be placed on practicing each tool.

Content:

  • This workshop provides simple and effective tools for managing difficult conversations and situations in the classroom and building (including Fights at School, Bullying in School and how to prevent them).
  • In addition to discussing restorative philosophy and approaches, you will practice methods and models of restorative solutions.
  • The session will conclude with action planning that can be implemented into the school

CLICK HERE to register for this class or to see a full list of restorative justice training opportunities offered by LCJP.

ClICK HERE to learn more about LCJP's Restorative Practices in Schools program.

ReEntry Volunteer Orientation - Assisting Parolees in re-entering their Community

Sunday, February 9, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

The ReEntry orientation will provide a brief overview of the ReEntry program for potential volunteers. A volunteer group will be chosen from a pool of applicants to build a team around each parolee/core member re-entering the Longmont community through this program.  Team members will be contacted and trained shortly before the release of the core member into the community.   

Program Basics: The LCJP community ReEntry program is a circle process designed to provide support and accountability for persons re-entering the community from a criminal detention facility. Volunteer participants provide insight and options in six life areas:  Employment, Family/Marital, Associates/Social Interaction, Substance Abuse, Community Functioning, and Personal/Emotional with weekly contract items in at least one of these areas.

Participants: The core member is the offender who was released from detention or prison and is re-entering the area. Community members may be comprised of anyone with a particular stake in the community who successfully complete training requirements and agree to follow the outlined duties of a community member. The participants remain the same for the duration of the process so that relationships can develop and grow.

Duration of the Process: The community circle meets for the duration of parole contract or up to one year. The group determines how often they meet within that time frame and changes it as needed though they begin with a weekly meeting for at lest one hour in length. The average commitment is for one year. 

Visit www.lcjp.org/training for  more information about our volunteer program and other great trainings.

 

How does participating in restorative justice increase leadership capacity in youth?

Friday, February 7, 2014 by Laura Snider

In addition to fantastic programmatic outcomes,* Longmont Community Justice Partnership's Restorative Practices in Schools program focuses on the cultivation of student leaders and mentors, healthy relationships between adults and youth, and productive dialogue about crime, conflict, community safety, prevention, and overcoming stereotypes. Volunteers on the Student RJ Team have participated in a collective total of 1500 hours of training and 2800 hours of service in the 2010-2013 school years. The cultivation of student leadership happens on a myriad of levels:

  • Youths act as assistant trainers for both school-based RJ trainings as well as Community Restorative Justice trainings, elevating the youth voice and setting a standard for all participants, regardless of age or experience.
  • The student internship program has evolved to include high school and college age interns, developing a clear mentorship track from high school to professional level.
  • We have established small teams of trained youth community members at each of the pilot middle schools, which serves not only to have youth representatives from each school community, but also sustainability for the Student RJ Team because recruitment becomes a natural progression from middle to high school.
  • With 81% of RPS processes facilitated by student-student facilitation teams, the youth feel increased ownership the process and their role as leaders.
  • In the 2012-2013 school year there was an increase of self-referrals from students who want to prevent conflict. 22% of the referrals came from students who heard about the program and decided to be preventative, or who were referred to the program for a different offense and asked for RJ when an unrelated issue arose.
  • Bringing together diverse groups of students requires the development of high-level communication and conflict resolution skills. The demographics of the Student RJ Team have grown to include special needs students (25% of the team), former offenders/referred students and victims/harmed parties (30% of the team), bilingual/bicultural students (40% of the team) and a cross-section of high school students (from football players to drama club members, each class from freshmen to senior is represented).
  • The peer-to-peer debriefing structure that is in place for every training, RJ process, pre-conference and outreach activity both increases student's RJ skills and allows for the development of the ability to give and receive feedback to and from adults and peers.
  • The ability to build strong relationships with referred students and school personnel (including SROs) is a natural outgrowth of participation in the RPS Program and has allowed for the students to look at both SROs and school personnel in a different light, increasing their connection to them and their bonding at school.
  • Recognition for youth service and leadership as part of this program has come from the City of Longmont Si Se Puede Awards, Boulder County Multicultural Awards, SVVSD School Board recognition and the Longmont Public Safety Awards. Strong relationships between students and adults in the building promote safer schools and reduce students' feelings of isolation.
  • Youth present to adults and peers on issues such as proactive school discipline, transformation not incarceration, how to prevent bullying in school, and the youth perspective on restorative justice in schools.
  • Since the start of the Pilot Project, 75% of referred students have had agreement items that address stronger relationships with adults and peers in the building, academic success and increasing community safety.

Cultivating student leaders was an unexpected by-product of implementing a restorative justice program in the schools that has grown into a core component of all school-based RJ work here at LCJP.

 

*Our program outcomes for the 2010-2011, 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 school years include:

  • 332 youth offenders have been referred to the RPS program since August 2010
  • An average of 94% of those who participated in a restorative process completed their RJ agreements successfully
  • Prevented 166 court referrals
  • Eliminated 7 expulsions and 8 students from moving toward expulsion
  • Reduced one expulsion from a full school year to one quarter—an increase of 131 in-school days
  • Avoided 302 total school days of suspension—or 2114 class time hours)
  • An average of 96% satisfaction with restorative processes reported on post-process questionnaries from referred students, harmed parties, school personnel, SROs, and youth community members

Similarities and differences in Mediation and Restorative Justice

Wednesday, February 5, 2014 by Haley Farrar

In my last post, I briefly mentioned Howard Zehr's comments regarding differences between ADR and Restorative Justice.

Over the last couple of weeks, I participated in a mediation training with Judy Mares-Dixon through the Colorado Bar Association. I learned so much, but was particularly surprised at the areas of overlap and difference between restorative justice and mediation.

I had naively assumed that my minimal training and experience in restorative justice programs facilitation would make mediation training seem a little redundant. I was very wrong.

While the required skill set is similar, the techniques and realities feel very different. The biggest difference seems to be that in restorative justice, the offender(s) must take responsibility at some point. In mediation, it's possible (in fact, likely) that no single party will (or can!) take responsibility for the root of the conflict. 

I was also surprised to learn about the differences in perceived truth. In mediation more often than in restorative justice, the basic facts of the conflict can vary wildly between the parties. One thing we say in our restorative justice conferences is, "this is not a court of law; we are not here to determine guilt or innocence." This is also true in mediation, but I'm learning how important it is to build agreement in mediation, even regarding the basic facts.

There are also many similarities. During this training, one of my colleagues repeatedly stated that he believed "money is root of the problem" in nearly every simulated mediation scenario. Meanwhile, I had prioritized issues such as reputation, a feeling of betrayal, and respect much higher than the issue of how much money each party would receive. As the role plays were acted out, those "soft" issues I had identified came up over and over, while the financial issue was resolved in a matter of minutes. Of course, this would not always be the case, but it highlighted the need to address all areas of the conflict.

Every conflict contains harms. Each harm must be identified before the conflict can be resolved. Oftentimes, a party needs an apology or a simple acknowledgement of the pain they're experiencing far more than they need a fat check. I, for one, am glad that restorative justice exists to give me the tools and language to be able to facilitate that process. 

Another option

Restorative Justice Education Series #3 - Self Care Through Debriefing

Tuesday, February 4, 2014 by Candy Campbell

The Longmont Community Justice Partnership is pleased to announce the Restorative Justice Education Series. This series of free trainings has been developed to meet the ongoing training needs of Longmont Community Justice Partnership Volunteers, our Restorative Justice colleagues, and the community 

The third Restorative Justice Education Series offered will address the importance of self-care through debriefing in Restorative Justice Practices.

Restorative justice processes, at their very core, make use of storytelling as a means of identifying, addressing, and repairing harm.  As facilitators and community members, we witness and participate in the process of restoring crime and conflict based on the 5 R’s of relationship, respect, responsibility, repair of harm, and reintegration.  Often these experiences are meaningful and significant, without exception they require emotional investment.  As volunteers and professionals involved in these processes, the practice of self-care is of utmost importance.  One tool that can be used to promote self-care is the practices of an in-depth debrief with others involved in the process. 

Visit:   LCJP TRAINING 

RJ Education Series #4 - Community Resources for Restorative Justice Agreements

Monday, February 3, 2014 by Candy Campbell

The Longmont Community Justice Partnership is pleased to announce the Restorative Justice Education Series. This series of free trainings has been developed to meet the ongoing training needs of Longmont Community Justice Partnership Volunteers, our Restorative Justice colleagues, and the community. 

The final installment of the Restorative Justice Education Series offered will provide an overview of community resources and how their services may be utilized in creating effective restorative justice agreements.

We Will:

  • Provide an overview of the community resources  (such as local nonprofits and government agencies) available to assist volunteers in writing good contract items
  • Review the elements that make up a good agreement items
  • You will have the opportunity to practice creating effective restorative justice contracts by incorporating the offerings of community resources using scenarios from actual restorative justice processes.

 

Visit:    LCJP TRAINING

 

What does Community Member Training for Restorative Justice Look Like?

Sunday, February 2, 2014 by Candy Campbell

Longmont Community Justice Partnership's community member training is a unique opportunity to get involved as a volunteer with restorative justice in Boulder County. This 4 hour orientation will brief you on LCJP's mission and vision, the history of our organization, a restorative justice primer and what volunteering as a community member or facilitator looks like in a circle process.

Answers to questions during this orientation include:

WHAT can I do as a volunteer?

  • Share how crime affects you and your community.
  • Help offenders create a plan to make things right.
  • Hear the stories of   victims and offenders.

WHO can be a Restorative Justice volunteer?

  • All are welcome! Both Youth and Adults
  • Full training is provided; no experience necessary.

WHY be a Restorative Justice volunteer?

  • To actively build a safer community.
  • To hear the voice of victims, and to assist offenders in seeing the real impact of their choices.

        WHERE and WHEN can I volunteer?     

  • In Longmont, on a flexible schedule; 2 to 6 hours/month.

Visit  www.lcjp.org/training for more information about commuity member orientation and other great training opportunities.

 

 

Restorative Justice Training and Events January - April 2014

Wednesday, January 29, 2014 by Viktoria Lawson

For full calendar and to register for Training & Events click here!

Program  ***

Date

Time

Event

$

Code ***

 

JANUARY

 

 

 

 

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Jan 11

9:00a-1:00p

New Community Member Training

$25

µ, P

CRE

Jan 11

1:30p-3:30p

ReEntry Volunteer Orientation

$25

µ,%, P

RDM

Jan 15

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

RDM

Jan 23

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

RPS

Jan 27

3:00p-8:00p

For Youth By Youth

$25

µY

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Jan 28

6:00p-8:00p

Surrogate Victim Training

$25

µ

 

FEBRUARY

 

 

 

 

RPS

Feb 1

9:00a-1:00p

Introduction to Restorative Practices in Schools

$50

µ

RPS

Feb 5

8:00a-10:00a

Late Start Training

$0

X,Y

RDM

Feb 6

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Feb 8

9:00a-1:00p

New Community Member Training

$25

µ,P

RDM

Feb 8

1:30p-3:30p

ReEntry volunteer orientation

$25

µ,%,P

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Feb 12

6:00p-8:00p

RJES#1 Self Care Through Debriefing

$25

µ

RDM

Feb 19

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Feb 25

5:30p-7:30p

Facilitator Peer to Peer Debrief & Dinner

N/A

X

 

MARCH

 

 

 

 

CRJ/CRE

Mar 4 & 6

(Must attend both days )

6:00p-8:00p

New Community Member Training

$25

µ,P

RDM

Mar 12

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

RDM

Mar 13

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Mar 15 & 16

(Must attend both days )

9:00a-4:30p

Restorative Circle Facilitator Training

$195

µ.1,P

CRJ/CRE

Mar 19

6:00p-8:00p

LCJP Program Specific Facilitator Training

$25

µ.1,P

 

APRIL

       
 

Apr 2

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Apr 8 & 10

(Must attend both days )

6:00p-8:00p

New Community Member Training

$25

µ, P

RPS

April 9

8:00a-10:00a

Late Start Training

$0

X,Y

CRJ/CRE/RPS

April 9

6:00p-8:00p

RJES#2 Writing Good Agreement Items Using Community Resources

$25

µ

RDM

Apr 24

6:30p-8:30p

Decision Making Workshop

$40

A

CRJ/CRE/RPS

Apr 26

9:00a-4:30p

Advanced Facilitator Training

$125

µ,P, F

CRJ/RPS

Apr 28

6:00p-8:00p

RJ Spanish English Interpreter Training

$25

µ,1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Program Abbreviations

Codes

CRJ- Community Restorative Justice

CRE- Community ReEntry

RPS – Restorative Practices in Schools

RDM- Restorative Decision Making

OPEN EVENT – Community Event Open to the Public

 

 

% -   Must sit in New Community Member training before participating in process.

O- Must participate in one process as a community member before attending training.

µ-  No charge for LCJP Volunteers to participate

X – Not Open to the public

A – Adults Only (18+ Years of Age)

Y – Youth Only

P – Application Required

F – Must facilitate/co-facilitate one process prior to attending training.

 

 

LCJP Volunteers work with Channel 8 to develop mock RJ Circle Training Video

Tuesday, January 28, 2014 by Ken Keusenkothen

LCJP has collaborated with Channel 8 and LCJP Volunteer Richard Lukon to create a documentary on the Restorative Justice programs and processes, and on LCJP as an organization.  As a part of the documentary, Richard worked with the LCJP staff to put together a video presentation of a mock circle process based on an actual process that was referred to LCJP.  The outcome was a 1 hour video of a community group conference which will now be used to help educate new community members and facilitators.  The cast for the mock circle includes Restorative Practices in Schools (RPS) Student Team Members Claire Rugg, Valentina Garces, Sally Hedderman Peter Bartolo,  CRJ Volunteer Tonya Dalhaus,  Longmont Police Officers Jason Malterud and Alan Baldivia,  and LCJP Staff members Kathleen McGoey and Laura Snider.

To learn more about volunteering with LCJP go to Volunteer Today.